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remember the united states as a country that helped or a country that did not help? definitely afghanistan will remember the united states as a country that helped. definitely afghanistan will remember that it was the u.s. assistance that brought so much to afghanistan. who will forget the less pleasant aspect ours relationship and we will move forward in the gratitude of the help that the united states has provided to afghanistan and also our other neighbors. but from today as we move forward will this relationship be a emotional as it was at time as you have heard in the past many years? will this relationship billion more mature? this relationship has already grown mature. we recognize the united states interest and afghanistan and the region and the united states recognizes that afghanistan is a good country. and has a life of its own. it has a law of its own and has a social context of its own. in that social context afghanistan will move forward in partnership with america and also until partnership with the other countries of nato that have helped us in the past many years. will afg
is in fact what happens. this was a chronology and when the united states government announced a large-scale resettlement of iraqis in 2007, we immediately looked at what we should be doing in light of this particular population which was different, in nationality we had not been resettling a great deal. we looked at enhancements which could bring on board that would address this new population and that's when we created the partnership with d.o. de. later >> was this in 2007? >> will yes, later when we identified a new partnership with the counter-terrorism center, that was initially focused on iraqi applicants but we learned by doing and we learned about the heightened level of checks and then we expanded to applicants of all nationalities. we use the iraqi program to raise the bar across the board for other nationalities. >> there were some 25,000 per year for a few years, isn't that right? >> i believe the high point was 18,000 ballots did you have the resources to do some kind of fairly thorough assessment of each of those 18,000 before they were able to be granted -- >> yes, sir,
of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the sa; that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice president: the clerk will call the names of the next group. the clerk: mr. cardin of maryland. mr. carper ofelaware. mr. casey of pennsylvania. mr. corker of tennessee. the vice president: please raise your right hands. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that you bear true faith and allegiance to the same that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god the group: i do. the vice president: congratulations. [applause] the vice pre
in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning for only the second time in the history of the house of representatives, we will read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this reading will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. we also hope that this reading will help demonstrate to the american people that the house of representatives is dedicated to the constitution and the system it establishes for limited government and the protection of individual liberty. the text we are reading today reflects the changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it. those portions superseded by amendment will not be r
and grand children. i hope they can go up in the freedom that has uniquely been the united states of america. the united states of america. >> i, barack obama, do solemnly swear -- >> this weekend, president obama begins his second term, sunday, the official swearing-in ceremony at the white house before noon eastern. coverage include your phone calls and a look at the 2009 inaugural address and then the public ceremony with the swearing in at noon eastern and other festivities, including the luncheon and the afternoon parade. coverage begins at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span radio and c- span.org. join the conversation on facebook.com/c-span. >> new features including video feeds from our c-span crew, on demand of the major events, individual -- visual blog page of behind-the-scenes photos. next, highlights from the 2009 inauguration of president obama. and another chance to see chelsea clinton taking part in the national day of service event. in 2009, activities began with president-elect and mrs. obama attending church services across from the white house. they went to the white house and th
u.s. banks offline one day, one bank after another. if the united states and israel bomb iran next year to stop the nuclear program i think we can say with high confidence that iran will retaliate. since israel or united states have attacked their homeland iran will attack in our homeland. not with terrorism but with cyber war, knocking out banking prehaps, electricity, causing havoc and getting away with it because we cannot defend successfully today against that kind of attack. [applause] >> that's a sobering thought to start a conversation with. as it happened, there were two pages in this week's "economists" that you should have on this subject on cyber war and i think it is helpful, if you can walk us through what exactly is meant by cyber war. you, yourself, mention cyber crime, cyber espionage there is a blurring of the lines. what do you mean by cyber war? >> you can rebbe using the word chuw. criber crime which is successful -- cyber crime which is successful. the cyber espionage which i think is the most serious thing today, that is the theft not 06 money but information,
in as an officer of the united states navy. i will introduce you to the whole family. my daughter, who is a social worker. and my daughter in law on the left. my number three granddaughter, 9 number two granddaughter, nine no. 4 granddaughter -- my number two granddaughters, my no. 4 granddaughter, my oldest granddaughter who is a freshman in college now, naomi. and my third son. i told my daughter when she married, if you change your mind, i'm keeping him. [laughter] i'm very proud of them although i would be happy to claim as my this is a family affair. kids, grandkids, moms, dads. you all get it. you get what it is so important today. we still have 68,000 troops in harm's way in some of the most godforsaken territory in the world. one of the things that you all know -- they are not looking for anything. but knowing that you remember. that we back home remember, we know what is going on. this is an important piece of the equation. another important piece as they started the organization, their families, -- [indiscernible] fighting these two wars. thank god we ended one in iraq and we are ending
and gentlemen, the journey we began together in 2001, that is afghanistan and the united states. it was for a great cause. freeing civilians from terrorism and radicalism, little bitter rating afghanistan -- liberating afghanistan from an invasion and a rule by the taliban. the first one, in reverse order, the first one freeing afghanistan happened within a month and a half to two months. subbing squect of that afghanistan began its journey towards democracy, the rule of law, progress in all aspects of life. it went all right. it went reasonablely good under the circumstances. without a doubt with the help of the united states and our other allies around the world. the second part, freeing us all from terrorism and radicalism, didn't work as swiftly as we expected. there was bumps along the road and setbacks. now, the afghan people regardless where they stand recognize that afghanistan could not have made the progress that we have made in the past 10 years without the help we received from our allies. led by the united states of america. in more cruder terms the u.s. taxpayer's
, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will come to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me, god. [applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] >> >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. senator hatfield, mr. justice, mr. president, vice president bush, vice president mondale, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. the orderly transfer of authority as called for in the constitution routinely takes place, as it has for almost two centuries, and few of us stop to think how unique we really are. in the eyes of many in the world, this every-4-year ceremony we accept as normal is nothing less than a miracle. mr. president, i want our fellow citizens to know how much you did to carry on this tradition. by your gracious cooperation in
status and resettlement in the united states. while the motivation behind creating these special immigrant categories were well intentioned, the fact remains that in may 2011, two iraqi nationals who were given refugee status and resettled in the u.s. were arrested and accused by the fbi of plotting to send weapons and money to al qaeda in iraq. one of the men arrested had openly discussed his prior experience as an insurgent in iraq and the ied attacks he participated against u.s. troops. the fingerprints of the other iraqi refugee charged were traced by the fbi to a component of an unexploded ied that was recovered by u.s. forces in northern iraq. in the wake of these arrests, dhs secretary janet napolitano and others have publicly acknowledged that security checks have been expanded to the more than 58,000 iraqi refugees who had already been settled in the united states. according to press reports this past february, intelligence indicates that the threat posed by refugees with ties to al qaeda is much broader than was previously believed. fbi director robert mueller stated la
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. the united states of america was 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the puzzle is to elect pro-choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with are pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how m
cooperation in the transition process, you have shown a watching world that we are a united people pledged to maintaining a political system which guarantees individual liberty to a greater degree than any other, and i thank you and your people for all your help in maintaining the continuity which is the bulwark of our republic. the business of our nation goes forward. these united states are confronted with an economic affliction of great proportions. we suffer from the longest and one of the worst sustained inflations in our national history. it distorts our economic decisions, penalizes thrift, and crushes the struggling young and the fixed-income elderly alike. it threatens to shatter the lives of millions of our people. idle industries have cast workers into unemployment, human misery, and personal indignity. those who do work are denied a fair return for their labor by a tax system which penalizes successful achievement and keeps us from maintaining full productivity. but great as our tax burden is, it has not kept pace with public spending. for decades we have piled deficit upon def
or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? i do.ndistinct conversations >> congratulations, senator. [indistinct conversations] [laughter] >> okay. [indistinct conversations] >> will you pull that back a little bit? >> you have to pull back so we can see the most important part of this team. please raise your right hand. do you solemnly swear or affirm that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same, that you take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that you will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which you are about to enter, so help you god? >> i
panel would be familiar to what we have heard today. if there were talking about the united states. they would say there is a general consensus that reform is necessary on major issues. there is no general consensus. there is grave doubt as to where the system will be able to overcome to produce in the united states important reforms that will leave this country in a reformed state as opposed to hard battles that will results reforms that are ineffective. that question is paramount. it is paramount in the united states as we look at some of the same issues. having said that, despite the vast differences between mexico and the united states, we really are quite similar. there is the feeling that something new is needed. the does not seem to be a consensus on how to get there. in general terms, i think how each of the government's in l with -- governments dea the reforms will require a great deal of care. i will explain that. i think most of the people in this room understand the relationship between mexico and the united states is generally a healthy relationship. this is not always
the way back to a deal that john lewis and harry truman made in 1946. the united mine workers and i insisted on a new law that we called the coal act protecting 200,000 miners and their families today. we actually helped avert a nationwide coal strike in 1994. in that fight, and so many others, we have been proud to stand with the working men and women of america. steelworkers, teachers, nurses, and everyone deserves a fair wage and a safe place to work with a basic health care. [applause] our country cannot be as great as it should be unless our workers voices are heard and respected. not only by everybody in general, but certainly policymakers. i am just a single-minded about comprehensive health-care reform. i know is not particularly popular in west virginia, but it's ok. because of my fingerprints are all over it, i know is good and i know it will benefit west virginia more than any other state. it is so incredibly complex, not just the 17% of gdp has people like to say, but it is so complex and involved and interests of people, nuances that we just had to do something about it
states, he will protect the constitution of the united states, and that is what i hope he takes very literally, and not hypocritically. i hope that he does take it literally, like i said. >> he brings up the topic of guns and gun violence. something that we will hear from the president in the weeks ahead. do you think it will be in the inaugural address? >> not explicitly. maybe some reference to making our country safer, keeping our children safe may be in their, but he will not make a pitch for gun legislation, not explicitly. >> what makes a successful second inaugural address? [laughter] >> getting to make it. [laughter] being there. it has to have a good sense of the moment. it has to be not too time bound, and it needs a sense of history as well, because only then will be read years and generations down the road. >> i agree, it has to assure the country we are on the right path, we can build on what we have done the first four years, in need to be optimistic, not fatalistic, and again, it has to have the broad themes that will be fleshed out in later policy speeches. >> te
qaeda or its continued plotting against the united states and other countries. the preeminent security threat to the ad states remains al qaeda and its adherents. since september 11, the counter- terrorism effort has been aimed at preventing the counter terror -- the counter efforts of al qaeda on the homeland. al qaeda continues to edify operatives overseas and develop new methods overseas to attack us at home. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core leadership in afghanistan and pakistan, including the middle east, and east africa, central asia, and southeast asia. although each group is unique, all aspire to advance al qaeda's agenda by stabilizing the companies in which they operate and attacking the u.s. and plotting to strike it u.s. homeland. in south asia, al qaeda continues to pose a threat from its base of operation in pakistan's tribal areas. in order to use that to carry a attacks against a homeland as well as our interests and those of our allies and partners in pakistan, afghanistan, india, and europe. the united states faces to counter terrorism charges -- a d
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
president biden. >> ladies and gentlemen, the vice-president of the united states and dr. by and accompanied by supreme court justice sonya sotomayor. [applause] >> and the vice-president has asked we bless this occasion with prayer. so let us pray. the profit micah proclaims you have been told what is good and what the lord require review. only to do justice and love good this and what horribly with your guide. gracious god, at this moment in our history, we ask your blessing on your servant joseph as he renews his sacred pledge to his country. amid all the complexities of our world, a world so beautiful but also broken, give him a share of your wisdom so he can know what is good and give him the courage to do what is always right. what close by him so he can do justice and labor tirelessly for a more just and gentle world. empower him to be a voice without a voice, for those on the margins, those so easily overlooked for you will judge assault by how we care for the least among us. continue to give him the ability to always call upon you in times of need and with the gift of faith given to
of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon all who contribute to the -- upon our armed forces, blessings upon all of contribute to the essence of the american. -- of the american spirit, the american dream,the opportunity to become whatever in mankind or womenkind allows us to be. this is the promise of america. let's act upon team meeting that everyone is included. upon the meaning that everyone is included. it may be inherent dignity and in alienable rights of every warming, a man, boy, and girl be honored. make all your people, especially -- and may all your people, especially the least of these flourished in our blessed nation. 150 years after the emancipation proclamation and 50 years after the march on washington we celebrate the. spiritof our ancestors. it is a nation of on bormann hopes and a history of this enfranchised folks to the union. -- to the expression of a more perfect union. we ask that where our past was riddled by pangs of despair and depression, we ask for your guidance toward the light of delivery and that the vision of -- of deliverance and that
specific importance to the united states we understand, as was for us the issue of sovereignty and the tensions and the continued presence of international forces in afghan villages and the conduct of the war itself. with those issues resolved, as we did today, the rest was done earlier, i can go to the afghan people and argue for immunity for u.s. troops in afghanistan in a way that afghan sovereignty will not be compromised, in a way that afghan law will not be compromised, in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through our talks will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks, and will also provide the afghan people the benefit that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. [indiscernible] that is not for us to decide. it is an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it is the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan will have no p
created in your image, a unit of god's grace, unprecedented, a repeatable and irreplaceable. we play -- pray for your blessing. with out it we will see only what the eye can see. we will see that we're created in your image, whether brown, black, or white, male or female, first-generation immigrant american or daughter of the american revolution, gay or straight, rich or poor. we pray for your blessing. without it we will only see scarcity in the midst of abundance. with your blessing we will recognize the abundance of the gifts of this good land with which you have and out of this nation. we pray for your blessing. bless all of us. privilege to be a resident of this nation with a. of gratitude in humility that we may be a blessing. we pray that you will shower with your life giving spirit, that will be leaders of this land, especially barack our president and joe our vice-president. fill them with righteousness that they may serve this nation ably and be glad to do your will. endow their hearts with wisdom and forbearance so that peace may prevail with righteousness, and justice wit
. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states. [applause] >> for myself and for our nation, i want to thank my predecessor for all he has done to heal our land. [applause] in this outward and physical ceremony, we attest once again to the inner and spiritual strength of our nation. as my high school teacher, miss julia coleman, used to say, "we must adjust to changing times and still hold to unchanging principles." here before me is the bible used in the inauguration of our first president, in 1789, and i have just taken the oath of office on the bible my mother gave me just a few years ago, opened to a timeless admonition from the ancient prophet micah -- "he hath showed thee, o man, what is good, and what doth the lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy god." this inauguration ceremony marks a new beginning, a new dedication within our government, and a new spirit among us all. a president may sense and proclaim that new
ever bless the united states of america. [applause] >> the united states marine band. my country tis of thee sweet land of liberty if thee i sing land where my fathers died lad of the pilgrim's pride from every mountain side let freedom ring ♪ let music sweel the beach and ring from all the trees sweet freedom songs let silence break the sound prolonged ♪ our father guide to thee father of liberty to thee we sing ♪ long may our land be bright with freedom's holy light protect us by the might great god, our king ♪ >> pwow. our next distinguished guest is the appellate issue will share with us where -- poet who will share with us words he has composed for this location. occasion. >> one today. one sun rose on us today kindles over our shores greeting the facves of the great lakes acrossng a simple truth the greatplains rooftops, aking upf under each one a story told by oiur silten gestures my face, your face millions of faces each one yawning to life crescendoing to our day the pencil yellow school buses, for it stands, oranges betting our praise. sobered trucks and heavy with
of representing that beautiful and diverse city in the congress of the united states. each of us is here today is truly a representative, a representative in the truest sense of the word -- to represent the highest hopes and aspirations of the american people. on new year's eve -- some of you, a large number of members of congress joined hundreds of people at the national archives building where we observed at midnight the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. at midnight, there was an enactment of harriet tubman ringing the bell, ringing the bell, and as she rang the bell she said, "now we are free." it was quite an incredible moment and it was one that ushered in what president lincoln would call 'a new birth of freedom' for his era and for generations to come. that transformative moment in our history is a reminder of the best traditions we have as a people -- the ability and the obligation of each generation of americans to renew the promise of our founders, to carry forward the torch of progress, to reignite the american dream. this is who we are as americans. this is the ch
john roberts. >> ladies and gentlemen, the vice president of the united states, accompanied by justice sonia sotomayor. [applause] >> the vice president has asked that we bless the occasion with prayer. so, let us pray. the profit micah reclaims did you have been told, mortal, what is good, and what the board requires a view, only to do justice and love goodness, walking calmly with your god. gracious god, we ask your blessing on your servant, joseph, as he renews the pledge he made to his country. in all the complexities that, this world, give us your wisdom so that he can know what is good and give him the courage to always do what is right. walk close by him so that he can do justice and labored tirelessly for a more just and gentle world. empower him to be a voice for those without a voice. for those on the margins, so easily overlooked, you will judge us all for how we care for those among us. continue to give him the humility to call upon him in times of need and with the gift of faith given to him by his church and family, help him to always know of your presence. lord, protect
are acting to expand the opportunities for women to serve in the united states armed forces and to better align our policies with the experiences we have had over the past decade of war. ultimately, we are acting to strengthen the force. congress acted first in 1948 by legislating that women became a permanent part of the armed forces. last year, as the secretary mentioned, we acted to open thousands of mission-essential occupations at more echelons and more ground combat units. after months of work, the joint chiefs and i recently submitted to the secretary our unanimous recommendation to rescind the direct combat exclusion role for women. in so doing, we are acting to eliminate all unnecessary gender-based barriers to service. the joint chiefs share a common cause on the needed to start this now and to do it right. we are committed to a purposeful and principled approach, specifically, we would extend opportunities to wick in a way that would maintain readiness. and we will uphold the trust and confidence of the american people as we go forward. our nation demands no less. we'll also in
[cheers and applause] >> it is my distinct honor to present the chief justice of the united states, the honorable john roberts was administered the oath of office. everyone, please stand. >> are you prepared to take the oath, senator? >> i am. >> i, barack obama, do solemnly swear that i will execute the presidency of the united states and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. [cheers and applause] [fanfare sounds] ♪ [playing "presidential march"] [cannons firing] [cheers and applause] >> it is my great honor to present the 44th president of these united states, barack obama. [cheers and applause] [crowd chanting "obama"] >> thank you. thank you. my fellow citizens, i stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. i thank president bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition. 44 americans have now taken th
homes. because of the demand in housing . all of a sudden into the congress of the united states of the says we are going to put the full faith and credit of the united states of america on a 90-day leash. we are going to take the greatest economy in the greatest country, with the greatest responsibility in the world and we are going to put them on a 0-day leash. . how does a great country respond on a 90-day leash? we know what happened the world saw this happened. we got downgraded in the credit rating. that drove up the cost of borrowing in the united states. that drove up the borrowing cost of corporations. that drove up the costs of counties and cities that we represent. and we're told again that should we falter on the credit debt of the united states, that we can expect a downgrade and we can expect a further downgrade in cities and counties all over the country. and somehow we're supposed to believe this is a good plan. what this plan does -- can i have three additional minutes? mr. mcgovern: i yield the gentleman two additional minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gent
with the denver office of greenberg trow erring. he was the united states attorney for the district of colorado from 2006 to 2009. he's a former member of the attorney general advisory committee of the narcotics and drug trafficking subcommittee of that committee. he's an adjunct professor at the university. and he is distinguished for public service with the drug enforcement administration, the federal bureau of investigation and the secret service. he's going to help us understand law enforcement options and how to balance this power equation to get it right. michael grava, next to mihm is a professor at george mason university school of law and a visiting scholar at the american enterprise institute. the co-founder and former director for individual rights which is a public interest law firm. perhaps most on point today he is in my view probably the country's single most creative and thinker with a book on that subject called "real federalism: why it matters, how it could happen" and a very important book on the same subject published last year called "the upside down constitution." and fina
. [applause] >> if you get sick and choose to go to the united states, you have a higher risk of medical error. the cures for aids and alzheimer's will come from america, not canada. >> imagine a world without religious faith. not just no place to worship, no prayer, no scripture, but no men or women who, because of their faith, dedicate their lives to others. >> over us to supervise this. a celestial dictatorship. a kind of divine north korea. [laughter] >> i can't believe i'm about to say this, but dr. kissinger, you have six minutes. >> i think that is the kind of hypocritical argument i would find quite annoying. [laughter] >> you obviously finding it annoying even if you are not chinese. [laughter] >> well, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the munk debates on iran. [cheers and applause] this is munk's debates on iran's nuclear ambitions. it is my privilege to organize this series and once again at as your moderate. we begin with a look back, a look back of some of the memorable moments of previous debates. tonight is a special evening for this series. tonight is our 10th semiannual munk d
of a dignitary, in this case, the president of the united states. that is a way of saluted the dignitary, showing due deference and respect, and then we will play "yankee doodle" and then some traditional metal is before -- from the 18th-century arranged for today. ♪ [fifes playing] >> i am with the fife and drum corps. for this year, it has been strenuous preparing for the inauguration. we have had multiple rehearsals, marching, trying to get everything perfect. we also are premiering one of cowardice sequences, corporate sequences, and we are memorized in the last few months. >> in preparation for the parade, we do or rehearsals. we had a lot of music to learn. we rehearsed it together. individually, we memorized the music. then we added it to the marching. that was a whole nother process of getting precise, getting in sync. marching together, finding music simultaneously. >> this will be my fifth inaugural parade. i first was for president clinton's second in operation in 1997. each one -- second inauguration in 1997. each one is special. i have and in a different place in my career each tim
forces, and by following those roles, military personnel have combated unit -- immunity. you killed during combat, it is not murder. you have a community as a combatant. collateral damage is a corollary of that. if you drop a bomb and it kills the bad guy and some guys around them, as long as you applied the principles of laws of war, then those deaths are collateral damage. the cia has a drone program, and that is a civilian agency with civilian contractors that are not part of the military. the laws of war do not apply. they do not have competitive community. collateral damage does not apply absent combative community. i'm not sure where we get the authority to send civilians around the world to commit what i believe is murder. we finally have the catalyst in which -- the kill list -- when president obama campaign in 2008, he talked about a bush had got rid of our values, but i do not recall that president bush had to kill list determining when an american needs to die without trial. i'm hopeful that these will get reexamined in a second term. president obama met the plane carryin
people and the united states but of the entire region. and finally we reaffirmed the strategic partnership we signed last year in kabul, an enduring partnership between two sovereign nations. this includes deepening ties with trade, commerce, strengthening institutions, development, education, and opportunities for all afghans. men and women, boys and girls. and this sends a clear message to afghans and to the region as afghans stand up they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. now, let me close by saying that this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and make tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces still need to grow stronger. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governance and development that delivers for the afghan people and an end to safe havengs for al qaeda and its ilk. all this will continue to be our work. but make no mistake. our path is clear and we are moving forward. every day more afgha
,000 unnecessary deaths each year in the united states by using what's called a.e.d.'s, which are automatic external defibrillators. this is now allow -- this has now allowed people to be trained to save lives. this act was very important and i'm glad that it was signed as my bill. the fifth one that i'm very proud of that president bush signed is dealing with asthma conditions. self-administration of medication was prevented in schools because they had no drugs allowed and so many children had asthma and they needed epy pen or -- epi pen or abeauty rol, and if it wasn't available they could go into asthma attack. this bill allowed that-tsh these nurses and people at schools to have this type of treatment. the sixth one is the protection of lawful commerce in arms act. it was signed by president george w. bush october 26, 2005. it basically provided civil liability action, protection for companies who are manufacturing, distributing, or imported firearms or ammunition for damages that caused cities and states was suing the manufacturer. it was nuisance suits and i'm glad president bush sign
, and look at the state of immigration enforcement in the united states. this is about one-half of hours. >> good morning everyone, and happy new year. to those of you here with us today and those at home the winning this event. i am demetrios papademetriou, president of the immigration policy institute. i'd like to welcome you to the discussion of the institut's latest report titled, -- discussion of the institute's latest report. as you will see during the presentations and as you will conclude after the event is over, it is a formidable machinery that has been created in the united states over the past decade or decade and a half. the release of this report could not come at a more appropriate time. since the election and even before that, the president and leaders in the democratic party and the u.s. congress of both the would-both chambers of the u.s. congress, as well as key -- the democratic party and the u.s. congress -- both chambers of the u.s. congress have said this is time for a broad reform of the u.s. immigration system. we can only take them at their word. if this were to
. on the other hand i do not feel in my heart, that the hypothetical fiscal crisis for the united states is still many years in the future. it is not something that is about to crop up on us now. the world is sending us a signal with incredibly low interest rates. that is making it easier for us to remain our relatively profitable status. -- relatively profligate ways. we have the power to get back on a trajectory that works. it is the usual thing of how you do hard things. in your personal life you know about the urgent pile and the important pile and the challenges you get caught up doing. the same thing happened at the federal level. the urgent stuff, the crises are what get attention. that is the way we haven't been in fiscal policy. -- we have been making fiscal policy. we do have moments when something gets addressed. we look forward to more support? it is giving me the political and cons addition we have. -- consolation that we huff. one of the things we should encourage is to show some leadership. now there are three more crises lined up. assuming we have survived though can also show som
conflicts in the north. i'm not sure the united states has [indiscernible] >> thank you. great question. first and foremost, we recognize that it is not only the u.s., it is not our responsibility do just that, not the primary people. that must reside with the nigerian government. it we tried to take the lead, we would not get it right. we do not understand the context. we are americans and not nigerians. it would be difficult for us to be effective. our focus has been working through our u.s. ambassador with the nigerians to say, what can we do to help you? we think that is the right approach. we have an ongoing dialogue with the nigerian officials on what types of support might be helpful. for my comment about mali, there are numerous nigerian officers and noncommissioned officers who trained with us for a year in the united states and other programs across europe. we think that is a good endeavor. we are talking with the nigerians. they made some specific request to help them. some of the lessons that we have learned in iraq and afghanistan in countering improvised explosive devices,
of the united states senate. i do not run to make history. i ran to make a difference. a difference in the lives of families 75 doric and pay the bills. students who are struggling with debt. the difference in the lives of veterans who fought for us and need someone fighting for them when they return home from war. the difference in the lives of all intrapreneur is trying to build a business and working people trying to build economic security. i ran to make a difference. i intend to make a difference. just like nobody runs and wins a senate race alone, no one moves a country forward alone. just like i could not have won the election without the people in this very room, we cannot move the nation forward without your continued involvement. look around you in this room today. it is extraordinary. on monday, looked across the mall. everywhere there are women whose leadership can change the course of history. thousands of them make a decision about whether to seek public office. too many will hear the voices of the senate. those that turn to emily's list training andl find wh support. many will run
currently living in the united states that is contingent upon securing our borders. second, we reform our legal immigration that will build the american economy and strengthen american families. third, we create an effective employment verification system that will present identity theft and tend hiring of future unauthorized workers and lastly, we establish an improved process for e admitting future workers to serve our work force needs while protecting all workers. other bipartisan senators have stood in the same spot before trumpeting similar proposals. but we believe this will be the year congress finally gets it done. the politics on this issue have been turned upside down. for the first time ever, there is more political risk in opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. opportunity to act. but we will only succeed if the effort is bipartisan. by their presence today, my republican colleagues are making a significant statement about the need to fix our broken immigration system. we democrats are equally serious. we do not want immigration as a wedge issue. much rather we wan
ronald regan and one of the most decorated veterans of vietnam. united states senator. celebrated author. lawyer. and i thought he made a pretty strong, persuasive case. so did many of us. >> let's turn to cybersecurity. i was pleased that you mentioned cyber security in your initial remarks. they have moved expand its cyber security efforts. i have to talk about colorado. the air force academy is well positioned to train those. would you talk a little more on your take on cyber security and what sort of resources we need. >> i've been to those facilities in colorado a few times and don't know as much about them as you do, but i am familiar with them. they are essential to our national security. cyber, i believe represents as big a threat to the security of this country as any one specific threat. for all the reasons this committee understands. it's an insidious quiet, kind of a threat that we have never quite seen before. it can paralyze a nation in a second. not just a power grid or banking system. but it can knock out satellites. it can take down computers on all our carrier battle s
will ask if the united states of america is, in fact, a safe bet. markets could go haywire. interest rates would spike for anybody who borrows money -- every homeowner with a mortgage, every student with a college loan, every small business owner who wants to grow and hire. it would be a self-inflicted wound on the economy. it would slow down our growth, might tip us into recession, and ironically, would probably increase our deficit. so to even entertain the idea of this happening -- of the united states of america not paying its bills -- is irresponsible. it's absurd. as the speaker said two years ago, it would be -- and i'm quoting speaker boehner now -- "a financial disaster, not only for us, but for the worldwide economy." so we've got to pay our bills. and republicans in congress have two choices here: they can act responsibly, and pay america's bills, or they can act irresponsibly, and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be
should pay the tab for a bill they have already racked up. congress refused to give the united states the money to pay the bill on time the consequences could be catastrophic. our familieses and our businesses account no afford that dangerous game again. i congratulation the newly sworn members of congress and i look forward working with the new congress in a bipartisan way. if we focus on the interest of our country above the interest of our party i'm convinced we can cut spending and we can protect the middle class. we can step up to meet the important business that awaits us this year, creating jobs, fixing our infrastructure and our immigration system. educating our children and shielding them from the horrors of gun violence. this is not what we should do, these are things we must do. happy new year, everybody. >> i'm congressman dave camp and chairman of the house and means committee. let me be candid. i understand the frustrations of so many americans have with washington right now. you're right. this government we have spends too much and wastes too much. it is time to stand u
, but in a sustainable way. the united states should want to lead in how we do that. >> in the politics of abundance, there are several instances where you saved the president could act on his own without congressional approval. what are some of those instances? >> for example, in the area of education, the sector of education -- it is a question of how we accelerate it? the president working with the department of education could create a data exchange system that allows us to personalize education. there is a similar thing with healthcare. the president could use executive authority and lay the foundation and act to accelerate that movement to the digital platform. >> where does congress come in? >> in a number of places. at the end of the book, we lay out for trades we think congress could take part. one is related to the broadband area. there was a ceo council that suggested that there are trillions of dollars of savings if the government moved all of its business services to the digital platform. what we proposed is a commission is where you get ceos in a room, make them look at those problems
the limitations, it can matter in certain places. that is a realistic assessment. part of the role of the united states is to go into the interior to redesign and so there are less a threat to the united states. when you have limited power, it makes someone like chuck tickle very skeptical of the ability of the united states to do that -- chuck hagel very skeptical of the ability of united states to do that. when he traveled with president obama, a think this was part of this discussion. host: what relationship does carry schmidt and senator hagel have? guest: if you look of a first term of the obama administration, there were doubts about his foreign policy and. it was natural for him to pick then-senator clinton to be secretary of state. i think in a second term, he is not running for reelection. he is more inclined to pick somebody he is comfortable with. the gun along in the senate, so presumably they will get along in it administrations -- they got along in the senate, so presumably they will get along in the administration. i think the fundamental reason, senator hagel, he and the presiden
for giving me the privilege of representing that beautiful and diverse city in the congress of the united states. each of us here today is truly a representative. a representative in the truest sense of the word. to represent the highest hopes and aspirations of the american people. on new year's eve, some of you, a large number of members of congress joined hundreds of people at the national archives building where we observed at midnight the 150th anniversary of the signing of the emancipation proclamation. at midnight there was an enactment of harriet tubman ringing the bill, ringing the bill. and as she rang the bell she said, now we are free. it was quite an incredible moment. and it was one that ushered in what president lincoln would call a new birth of freedom. for his era and for generations to come. that transformative moment in our history is a reminder of the best traditions we have as a people. the ability and obligation of each generation of americans to renew the promise of our founders. to carry forth the torch of progress. to reignite the american dream. this is who we ar
for the united states capitol police. my title is public information officer.s i'm an officer. the united states capitol police our responsibility in conjunction with our law enforcement partners is to ensure the safety of those attending the inaugural ceremonies throughout the weekend. first and foremost, we want everyone to enjoy the democratic process and this historic day. with any event that occurs on the capitol complex, safety is our number one priority. that said, safety and security for guests, public, et cetera, is not carried out just by us, but in partnership with our law enforcement community, metropolitan police, united states secret service, park police and other entities as well as public safety entities. the partnership that we have established to create a pretty robust plan has been in the works for many months and while i cannot go into detail about those -- about the security plan, please know we have trained extensively to address any issues that may come up during the day. thank you. >> thank you, officer. i appreciate that. as someone that did communications before heading
and on the month, the vice president of the united states and dr. biden accompanied by justice sotomayor. [applause] >> devised for the that has asked that we bless this occasion with prayer. let us pray. . micah blames you have been told what is good and what the board requires of you, only to do justice into love goodness, to walk calmly with your god. gracious god, at this moment in our history, we ask more blessing on your servant, joseph, as he renews his a broad pledge to his country. amid all the complexities of our world, the world's a beautiful but broken, give him a share of your residence and that he can know what is good and give him the courage to always do what is right. walk close by so that he can do justice and labored tirelessly for a more just and gentle world. empower him to be a voice for those without a voice, those on the margins, so easily overlooked. he will judge us all for how we care of the least among us. continue to give him the humility to always call upon you in times of need and with the gift of faith given to him by his church and family, help him to always know of
hands. when it comes to america's role in world affairs, i know we agree it is critical the united states remain fully engaged. we project the power of our military strength when necessary and the wisdom of our democratic ideals as we adjust to the new threats and demands we will face. there is no doubt he will be tested in your new role as secretary, nor is there any doubt that you will pass any tests with honors as you always have. let me thank you on behalf of the committee for all you have done in the senate and the chairmanship of this committee is an anticipation of your confirmation by the full senate, i wish you good luck and godspeed in many journeys that lie ahead. we look forward to having a close working relationship with you as the next secretary of state. let me recognize senator corker. >> thank you, mr. chairman. let me thank are three distinguished guests. i want to thank you for your courtesy over the last six years as i served on this committee. i looked at you and been nominated for this as someone who has lived their entire life for this moment of being able to
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